Musings on Scripture

– and what isn’t always said

Tag: Jeremiah

4th December 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

Matthew 3:1-12
matthew-3a-john-the-baptist-preaching

1John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness of Judea, proclaiming, 2‘Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.’ 3This is the one of whom the prophet Isaiah spoke when he said:
 ‘The voice of one crying out in the wilderness:
 “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.” ’
4John wore clothing of camel’s hair with a leather belt around his waist, and his food was locusts and wild honey. 5Then the people of Jerusalem and all Judea were going out to him, and all the regions along the Jordan, 6and they were baptised by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins.

7When he saw many Pharisees and Sadducees coming for baptism, he said to them: ‘You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? 8Bear fruit worthy of repentance. 9Do not presume to say to yourselves: “We have Abraham as our ancestor”; for I tell you, God is able, from these stones, to raise up children to Abraham. 10Even now the axe is lying at the root of the trees; every tree therefore that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.’

11‘I baptise you with water for repentance, but one who is more powerful than I is coming after me; I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptise you with the Holy Spirit and fire. 12His winnowing-fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing-floor and will gather his wheat into the granary; but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.’

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.


Oh how we’ve lost significant meaning of some words, because their over-use has resulted in the important meaning becoming subservient. One such word is “repent”. Too often, these days, “repent” is used as a synonym for “sorry”. The invitation to the confession in the Book of Common Prayer (1928) Eucharist opens with the words “Ye that do truly and earnestly repent you of your sins, and are in love and charity with your neighbours, and intend to lead a new life, following the commandments of God and walking from henceforth in His holy ways …” The BCP embraces that aspect of repentance which involves turning around from what we have been doing, and being genuine in our desire to live according to what God wants us to do. It’s too easy, with the common use of “repent” to think all we need to do is say “sorry” to God. Repentance includes an acknowledgement that our ways have not been according to God’s will, and that change is needed.

When John reportedly said “the kingdom of heaven has come near” he was, of course, working on the belief that Jesus was already around and would establish the kingdom of heaven, on earth. We know, from Christ’s own words, that even the Son didn’t know when he would return, so we can’t know either. That makes it all the more important that we are prepared for His second coming now, and don’t put off our preparations. “If the owner of the house knew at what hour the thief would come he would have stayed awake” [Matthew 24:43]. There is thus some urgency, even for us, to be prepared. If your Christmas plans include having friends or family to a celebration meal, do you leave dirty washing on the floors? Do you ignore the dust and the dirt on the floor? Do you go to the shops and only buy enough food for yourself? Of course not! If the kingdom of heaven is near, and we are preparing for the second coming of Christ, shouldn’t we do all the cleaning we would do to welcome our King? Shouldn’t we be serious about preparing the way for the Lord? Because of the lack of punctuation in the original writings, the quote from Isaiah could read “the voice of one crying ‘in the wilderness prepare the way for the Lord’”, in which case the lack of active Christian presence in our communities might be the wilderness in which the way needs to be prepared, or it could read “the voice of one crying in the wilderness ‘prepare the way for the Lord’”, in which case we have to listen to the lone voice, not the combined and harmonised voice, or leadership. Either way, we should be preparing the way for the Lord to enter into our lives in a decisive way. Let’s put out the welcome mat, and mean it.

Some may wonder why Matthew chose to mention what John wore and ate. I believe that it is to emphasise that this call to repentance comes not from the religious establishment, but from someone who could easily be discarded by that very establishment. John was different; John did not dress like everyone else; John did not eat what others would eat; but God chose John to proclaim the Good News. How often do our church leaders reject those who offer themselves to walk in Christ’s footsteps simply because they are different, and don’t fit the mold which those leaders use, probably subconsciously, in their ‘discernment’?

If you want to take literally the idea the people from all over Judea came to be baptised by John then you must acknowledge that he would have been a very busy beaver. The idea in the reference is, of course, that the people were clamouring for good guidance to renew their relationship with God in a meaningful way, and they weren’t being satisfied elsewhere.

We might think of John’s description of ‘Pharisees and Sadducees” as a brood of vipers in terms of Matthew trying to separate the Christian community from the Jewish one following the destruction of the temple in AD70, and that might be true, but there is also the element of criticism of the pedantic and legalistic approach of the Pharisees to the way they approach worship, in contrast with the loving, caring approach of Christ. Those who wish to behave like Pharisees should be reminded that Christ’s approach in nothing like theirs. Personally I’d prefer to follow Christ than follow any Pharisee. It is not good enough to just claim a direct link back to Abraham (or to the Apostles) if we have lost our way and become tied up with controlling everything everyone does. God is the master gardener, and, just as Christ did to the fig tree, He is prepared to chop down the biggest trees if they are not producing fruit. Let the one who has ears, hear. [Matthew 11:15]

When I think of this passage through EfM (Education for Ministry) eyes, I see a world in which the people are screaming for spiritual guidance because the religious hierarchy appears to have left them to themselves; I see an honest call to genuine repentance and dire consequences if we don’t; I see judgement in the form of the description of those who seek to escape the inevitable by being superficial; and I see hope of reconciliation through baptism, initially with water and later with the Holy Spirit.

Verse 11 includes an example of what I call the future present tense in English. Essentially we use the present tense to indicate something in the almost immediate future. When a friend is scheduled to have a meal with us next week, we say “my friend is coming” even though the friend may not leave for several more days. That gives us a sense of urgency, and gets us to prepare. John said “one who is more powerful than I is coming” even though Christ was not there. Maybe we should proclaim, in the Eucharist, “Christ is coming again” to stir us into action preparing the way for the Lord.

27th November 2016 (Advent)

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment
psalm-122-f
Image © City Church York, Pennsilvania

Psalm 122

1I was glad when they said to me,
    ‘Let us go to the house of the Lord!’
2Our feet are standing
    within your gates, O Jerusalem.
3Jerusalem—built as a city
    that is bound firmly together.
4To it the tribes go up,
    the tribes of the Lord,
      as was decreed for Israel,
    to give thanks to the name of the Lord.
5For there the thrones for judgement were set up,
    the thrones of the house of David.
6Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:
    ‘May they prosper who love you.
7Peace be within your walls,
    and security within your towers.’
8For the sake of my relatives and friends
    I will say, ‘Peace be within you.’
9For the sake of the house of the Lord our God,
    I will seek your good.

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.


I grew up with the understanding that the selection of scriptures set for any Sunday eucharist was made so that a common thread could be seen through them. That included the Hebrew Scripture passage, the psalm, a reading from the New Testament, and the gospel reading. On one Sunday, whilst in Bunbury, I preached a four course banquet, bringing to life all of the readings in relation to each other. In trying to limit my reflection to just one of the readings set for Advent Sunday 2016 I was faced with a dilemma, because they are all good readings for reflection, and they are tied together.

When I noted the psalm was 122 I was transported back to a time when Michael Wentzell was organist at St George’s Cathedral, in Perth, and to music written by René Rebound. This is a joyful song, celebrating an invitation to go to the house of the Lord. The music which Michael and Albert McPherson chose for their rendition of Psalm 122 is lively and joyful, unlike the usual rendering of the same psalm when read straight from the prayer book, whether done together or with a leader reading parts and the congregation reading the rest.

Together in Song, hymn 78, which Rebound, Wentzell and McPherson composed, opens with the refrain “I was overjoyed, Alleluia, when they said come with us to the house of the Lord.” Am I “overjoyed” when asked to go with someone to their “house of the Lord”? My answer to that is, unfortunately, “nothing like as often as I would like to be.” On my travels I have visited many parishes where the experience has not conveyed an impression of people who were overjoyed to be attending. To be fair, that’s not to say that the people haven’t been enthused by the Holy Spirit, or coming because they know that they can be spiritually fed. When I think of days when the church encourages people to bring others with them, I ask “if unchurched people come will they be turned away not by words or actions at the door, but by what they experience during the service. When joyful psalms sound anything but joyful, are we going to encourage people to come again? To me, that’s a “no brainer”.

For the Israelites of the time, Psalm 122 was a song to be sung on the way to the temple in Jerusalem – a time when they visited the most important religious shrine in their experience. To us, the most important religious shrine is usually our parish church, sometimes the cathedral. One of the beauties which these people encountered was that of their sacred music: they were uplifted by the sounds of well sung music and their joy was real. I remember the time when most parish churches had four-part choirs and someone with good musical skill to train them and to play for services. Alas, we have lost that in most places, so the uplifting of souls during our services is dependent on the hymns or songs chosen, how well they are presented, and how involved the congregation is in uplifting each other.

Verse 4 of the biblical version, or verse 2 of hymn 78, reminds us of our need to worship and to praise the name of the Lord for all time. We gather together to make a joyful noise to the Lord so that we are giving thanks to God for everything we have, good or bad. As someone said: “if you win the lottery, praise the Lord; if you’ve just got married, praise the Lord; if you break a leg, praise the Lord!”

Psalm 122 is also a song of hope, and expectation. Let us pray not only for peace in the physical city of Jerusalem, but also for peace in every place which represents Jerusalem for those who cannot be there. While we’re at it, let’s pray for God’s peace. Those of us who live in Australia might be thinking that we already live in a peaceful environment, but those who have been physically or mentally abused, robbed or defamed would hardly describe their own experience as one of peace; and those affected by the terrorist activities which we hear about more and more frequently would also dispute a sense of peace. God’s peace is far more than an absence of war on our own soil, because it includes a fair sharing of our resources and a willingness to look after each other.

In keeping with this thrust for God’s peace to reign in Jerusalem, we can think of today’s passage from Isaiah, in which the prophet suggests that, in response to the word of the Lord, people will turn their swords into ploughshares and their spears into pruning forks, and they will no longer learn to be at war. This is the way to God’s peace, not spending more and more on military might and threatening nuclear war because we can’t get our own way. Let us be responsible, rather than irresponsible like those who engage in violent behaviour of any kind; let us, from congregations all the way up the ecclesiastical ladder, speak up for God’s peace; and let us be overjoyed when we are called to the House of the Lord.

This psalm ends with a challenge. Note the last words: YOUR good. For the sake of the house of the Lord our God, which, to Christians, is all the people not just a building, we should seek God’s good. I acknowledge that that will be tough; but it is achievable.

20th November 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / 1 Comment on 20th November 2016

jaremiah-23-bJeremiah 23:1-6

1Woe to the shepherds who destroy and scatter the sheep of my pasture! says the Lord. 2Therefore, thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, concerning the shepherds who shepherd my people: “It is you who have scattered my flock, and have driven them away, and you have not attended to them. So I will attend to you for your evil doings, says the Lord. 3Then I, myself, will gather the remnant of my flock out of all the lands where I have driven them, and I will bring them back to their fold, and they shall be fruitful and multiply. 4I will raise up shepherds over them who will shepherd them, and they shall not fear any longer, or be dismayed, nor shall any be missing,” says the Lord.

5 The days are surely coming, says the Lord, when I will raise up, for David, a righteous Branch, and he shall reign as king and deal wisely, and shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. 6In his days, Judah will be saved and Israel will live in safety, and this is the name by which he will be called: ‘The Lord is our righteousness.’

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.


As with the vast majority of the writings of the prophets, the environment in which Jeremiah finds himself is one of corruption in the religious establishment. Like the other prophets, Jeremiah spent much of his time speaking God’s word to an unreceptive audience, just as 21st century prophets find themselves doing; and when an oracle, such as this, starts with “woe” it’s more than just bad news for those in the sights of the prophet. Given that attendances in “mainstream” churches – Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Uniting in particular – have been declining for many years I would not like to be a bishop, or equivalent, in any of them, and have to read this passage from Jeremiah. It’s the responsibility of clergy, at all levels, to guide the faithful flock and to build up that flock by welcoming new people and helping to convert non-believers into believers. Though the number of clergy involved in child sexual abuse in Australian institutions is small, and the proportion of errant clergy is no larger than the proportion in the wider community, the churches’ response to the issue is one which continues to drive people from our churches. Jeremiah doesn’t mince matters. ‘Woe to those shepherds who destroy and scatter the sheep’ is bad enough for the perpetrators of abuse, but the passage goes further. Those who have not attended to the problem are also in the firing line, and God is not happy! ‘I will attend to you for your evil doings.’ I’m reminded about a public meeting with one of the bishops, in which we were told 10% of people in the suburb we were in considered themselves Anglican, only 2% attended church at least twice a year making a parish unviable, and the solution was to make the parish bigger to have more people contributing to the cost of running it. Where is the Good Shepherd, bringing the lost sheep back to church? This scream from Jeremiah is all about divine judgement. We’ve been hit in the face with the reality of declining attendances, and then we’ve been hit with a warning of judgement to come because we either haven’t attended to the problem, or we’ve exacerbated it. There is no forgiveness in this passage, though we, as Christians, would expect, and hope, to find it.

On first reading I missed a challenging word, but then thought “hang on a minute”! God says that He will gather the flock from the lands where HE has driven them. Wasn’t it the unfaithful shepherds who had driven them away and not attended to them? I looked at several commentaries to check what renowned scholars were saying about that, and there were very few who said anything. A scholarly answer suggests that the shepherds were driving them out of their own land, and God was driving them to foreign lands, for their own safety, before being rescued and returned to Israel.

Jeremiah continues issuing the word of the Lord against a people who will not listen. God will take over feeding the sheep, and looking after them. He will be like The Good Shepherd and go looking for those who have been lost, bringing them back to the fold himself, because those who have had responsibility for that task have been like the hireling. When the lost have been returned to the fold, God will select a new breed of shepherds, one which will look after the flock faithfully. Ouch!! Are we listening, or are we just hearing?

Thankfully, there is hope of redemption and reconciliation for the flock which has been scattered and decimated. We can look forward to God bringing in a new era where we can live in safety, where the religious community will be well supported, where people are brought to Christ on a daily basis, and where the Good News will be celebrated.

When our Jewish friends celebrate the Passover, it is not a memorial of an event well in the past, but a real-live moment in their own lives, such is the connection with scripture. If we took the same approach with the birth of Christ then how would that affect our lives? Is that how God will bring back to the fold the lost sheep who don’t know they are lost?

 

 

18th September 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

Psalm 79

1O God, the nations have come into your inheritance; they have defiled your holy temple; they have laid Jerusalem in ruins.
2They have given the bodies of your servants to the birds of the air for food, the flesh of your faithful to the wild animals of the earth.
3They have poured out their blood like water all around Jerusalem, and there was no one to bury them.
4We have become a taunt to our neighbours, mocked and derided by those around us.
5How long, O Lord? Will you be angry forever? Will your jealous wrath burn like fire?
6Pour out your anger on the nations that do not know you, and on the kingdoms that do not call on your name
7for they have devoured Jacob and laid waste his habitation.
8Do not remember against us the iniquities of our ancestors; let your compassion come speedily to meet us, for we are brought very low.
9Help us, O God of our salvation, for the glory of your name; deliver us, and forgive our sins, for your name’s sake.

Text © New Revised Standard Version, used with permission.


We continue through a period of lament, with not only Jeremiah, but also the psalmist bringing the desperation of the people into focus.

Once again, as with Psalm 14, the wording suggests, on the surface, that the cause of the problem is “the nations”. “They” have defiled the temple; “they” have laid waste to Jerusalem. ‘Who is “they”?’ we might ask. If we consider that “we” are doing, or trying to do, what God wants us to do, then “they” includes anyone who is not doing the right thing. In a world where the Hebrew people were supposed to set themselves aside from the peoples around them, and keep to the commandments – better translated as commitments – thought to have been brought to us by Moses, and not to be defiled by the ways of those other peoples, any moves to adopt the ways of non-Hebrews could be seen as going against the will of God. It was the role of the temple leaders to guide the Hebrews away from the pitfalls of other religions, and their way of life, but when the leaders failed to keep the people honest to their task disaster would befall the nation. Time and again the prophets would rail against bad leadership, and against the “false prophets” to whom some leaders turned for justification. If we take the line that failure to honour the commitment to God’s teaching will bring about disaster, then the destruction of the temple and the flattening of Jerusalem in 586BC, which is probably at the heart of this passage, shows that the people had strayed significantly from the ways of God, and the leadership was very much involved in that errant behaviour.

Scripture doesn’t just tell us what happened in the past, but it teaches us how to address issues which affect us today, many centuries after those passages were written. It’s more than a historical record of events from which we can learn: it’s an insight into how we can avoid the problems of the past revisiting us. Given that, what can we learn from this section of one psalm?

First, the Hebrew people were supposed to keep to their faith and not be influenced by the ways of life of those around them, where that would put them in conflict with God’s will. The people were required to be distinct from those around them. Customs associated with their faith took precedence over customs of the others, so mode of dress, days of worship, commitment to worship, decisions about what was good for the community had to be consistent with their faith teaching. Orthodox Jews still maintain a diet free from pork, even though the real reason for its exclusion in biblical times – the way it rapidly becomes unsafe to eat if not treated properly – has been overcome. As Christians, how often are we distinguishable from the rest of the community? How often have we stood up against incursions into the day of rest? When people come to church are they getting the same sort of experience as they would get in any other organisation around? Do we make a commitment to our faith journey such that others are touched by what can be achieved, or do we depend on the church establishment to provide everything, and expect it to be free? Are our churches any better at dealing with accusations of sexual misconduct than other organisations, or businesses? If the answer to any of those questions is “No” then we might be falling into the same pitfalls as the Hebrews were before the destruction of the temple, and we might find that our temple is destroyed. Are we prepared to stand up for our faith, and pick up the pieces after our church institutions come crashing down around us, or are we going to speak up, and act, to repent and change our ways before such destruction happens?

The section of Psalm 79 set for the 18th of September ends with a call to God to help us, to forgive our sins, and guide us back to a righteous relationship with our Creator. This should be an important part of our daily prayer life.

11th September 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

Jeremiah 4:11-18

11It will be said to this people and to Jerusalem: A hot wind comes from me out of the bare heights in the desert toward my poor people, not to winnow or cleanse — 12a wind too strong for that. Now it is I who speak in judgment against them. 13Look! He comes up like clouds, his chariots like the whirlwind; his horses are swifter than eagles — woe to us, for we are ruined! 14O Jerusalem, wash your heart clean of wickedness so that you may be saved. How long shall your evil schemes lodge within you? 15For a voice declares from Dan and proclaims disaster from Mount Ephraim. 16Tell the nations, “Here they are!” Proclaim against Jerusalem, “Besiegers come from a distant land; they shout against the cities of Judah. 17They have closed in around her like watchers of a field, because she has rebelled against me, says the Lord. 18Your ways and your doings have brought this upon you. This is your doom; how bitter it is! It has reached your very heart.”

Text © New Revised Standard Version, used with permission.

The set text omits verses 13-18 and adds verses 21-28.

Psalm 14

1Fools say in their hearts, “There is no God.” They are corrupt, they do abominable deeds; there is no one who does good.
2The Lord looks down from heaven on mankind to see if there are any who are wise, who seek after God.
3They have all gone astray, they are all alike perverse; there is no one who does good, no, not one.
4Have they no knowledge, all the evildoers who eat up my people as they eat bread, and do not call upon the Lord?
5There they shall be in great terror, for God is with the company of the righteous.
6You would confound the plans of the poor, but the Lord is their refuge.
7O that deliverance for Israel would come from Zion! When the Lord restores the fortunes of his people, Jacob will rejoice; Israel will be glad.

Text © New Revised Standard Version, used with permission.


The principal aim of these reflections is to look at one passage of scripture from the selection set down for the Sunday before I post my comments. However, the selection of readings is supposed to have a common thread, and sometimes that thread requires a look at more than one passage. Today is an example.

The author of Psalm 14 is clearly expressing negative comments about the “fools” who do not believe in God and follow the teachings of scripture: the Lord looks down to see if anyone is wise and seeking after God, but “they” have all gone astray. Who are “they”? It’s incredibly easy for us to separate the wheat from the chaff and include ourselves on the “good” side of that separation, then label everyone who isn’t with us as against us. Sometimes that separation takes on a self-righteous tone which demeans us. Some years ago an Anglican bishop I knew was invited to the ordination service for a Roman Catholic deacon. Though the service included Holy Communion the Anglican bishop was not allowed to take the bread (or wine) because he wasn’t “Christian”, that is, he wasn’t baptised and confirmed in the Roman Catholic Church. At my son’s baptism we had Roman Catholic, Anglican and Uniting Church clergy participating, and the sermon made a point that we were not making a new Anglican but a new Christian. Far too often I hear comments along the lines of “you don’t do things the way we do, so you’re not Christian” even if the last bit is by implication, rather than direct statement. Psalm 14 rails against those who did things differently from the established trend, but the author wasn’t a prophet, rather a hymn writer. When we look at what a prophet was saying about the situation we are faced with a quite different scenario. Within verses omitted from the set text for the week – why they were excluded begs other questions – Jeremiah shouts “O Jerusalem, wash your heart clean of wickedness so that you may be saved” [v14], “Besiegers come from a distant land” [v16], and “Your ways and your doings have brought this upon you” [v18]. Once again the prophet is crying that the leaders are just as corrupt as any of those against whom they rail. Isaiah put it another way: “All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way.” [Is 53:6]

It’s very easy for us to think that these passages refer to times in the history of the Jewish communities, but, as with all scripture, there is a message for us in the 21st century just as much as there was when Jeremiah was writing, mostly in the 7th century BC. What this combination of passages calls on us to do is to look at ourselves and see if we are guilty of classing ourselves as “good” and others as “bad” when the labels could easily be reversed. Have we lost track of what we are called, by God, to do in this world? Have we put ourselves above others as better Christians? Have we failed to recognise the Christ in others and looked for ways to denigrate those who are different from us, or approach our task of worship differently? How many false prophets have we allowed into “the Church”?

I have no doubt that sexual misconduct by those who have been able to get into influential positions in the church, either as clergy or lay leaders, is contrary to the message of love which comes from God, at least as perceived by the vast majority of Australians, but I truly wonder if we have been like the hireling who deserted the flock of sheep when a wolf attacked [John 10:12]. Only a tiny proportion of those entrusted with God’s work in the various denominations has failed to honour that task, yet we have allowed a very negative response from the non-church-going public to cloud the very good work done by the majority, and we have allowed those many good Christian leaders to be tarred with the same brush as those who have brought disgust.

 

4th September 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment
the-potter
Else Berg, ‘Potter’ from Art in the Christian Tradition, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library, Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Jeremiah 18:1-11

1The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: 2“Come, go down to the potter’s house, and there I will let you hear my words.” 3So I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was working at his wheel. 4The vessel he was making of clay was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel, as seemed good to him. 5Then the word of the Lord came to me: 6Can I not do with you, O house of Israel, just as this potter has done? says the Lord. Just like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in my hand, O house of Israel. 7At one moment I may declare concerning a nation or a kingdom, that I will pluck up and break down and destroy it, 8but if that nation, concerning which I have spoken, turns from its evil, I will change my mind about the disaster that I intended to bring on it. 9And at another moment I may declare concerning a nation or a kingdom that I will build and plant it, 10but if it does evil in my sight, not listening to my voice, then I will change my mind about the good that I had intended to do to it. 11Now, therefore, say to the people of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem: Thus says the Lord: Look, I am a potter shaping evil against you and devising a plan against you. Turn now, all of you from your evil way, and amend your ways and your doings.

Text © New Revised Standard Version, used with permission.


In many churches the sermon would have been based on the Gospel reading, from Luke, but there is much for us to glean from the passage from Jeremiah.

Jeremiah was a prophet, and the task of the prophet was to remind the religious hierarchy of their responsibilities in following God’s teaching. The same applies to today’s prophets – and, yes, there are plenty around today, but, like in Jeremiah’s day, some people wanted them in places where they couldn’t do any damage. Time and again a prophet would rise from the people and point out that the hierarchy were not always doing the right thing according to scripture, and the hierarchy, realising that the perks they had woven into their ways of doing things and getting others to do things, would be lost if they truly repented of their sins and turned their teaching around.

The common way of looking at the story of Jeremiah being led to the potter’s house runs along the lines of the potter being able to remodel the clay of the vessel under construction if what is developing is not desirable. God, as the potter, can restart the modelling process, or can continue to model that same piece of clay into something remarkable, because un-fired clay is malleable, not brittle or rigid.

Something else comes to my mind, though. In 1859 Charles Darwin stirred the religious world by publishing a book on evolution. “God forbid” cried the churches, which had, for millennia, taught that God created the world in six 24-hour days, and rested on the seventh. Evolution and Darwin were diametrically opposed. Darwin must be shown to be a fraud. Many of us have heard the joke about a man asking God if it’s true that one second to Him was the equivalent of ten thousand years to us, and, with a positive reply asking for a million dollars, to which God responded “in a minute.” If we take that line, then the “periods of time” (which is far closer to the meaning of the Hebrew text than “24-hour day”) become exceedingly long – well beyond the comprehension of even the people who finally wrote down the passages we find in Genesis. New species are still being formed, older ones, with no further part to play in the potter’s work, are disappearing. That, of course, should not be taken as an excuse for doing nothing about human contributions to the accelerating number of species becoming extinct. Improvements within one species take time to develop, just as the shape of the potter’s vessel takes time to develop. Arms and legs could be formed to fit a purpose, and modified as that purpose changed. We, too, can be co-creators with God of new things in today’s world, but if we go off the beaten track prepared for us then we can be in need of the prophet’s call to repentance and reconciliation, or in need of the potter’s intervention, as happened to Saul on the way to Damascus.

Jeremiah’s message is not just for those of his own time, but for Christians today too – all of us, and everyone in between. How far have we strayed like lost sheep because the potter is not in control? Are we willing to allow the potter to regain control and make something remarkable from the mess we offer? Do we need to change our ways? That could be at a personal level; it could have much to do with what happens in our churches; it could involve how we, as a church, respond to things which go wrong beyond our control. Are we going to be co-creators with God of a new revolution within the church, and the benefit from the rewards of repentance? I hope so.