Musings on Scripture

– and what isn’t always said

Tag: Messiah

Trinity 13A

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

Matthew 16:21-28 Jesus Foretells His Death and Resurrection

21Jesus began to show his disciples that He must go to Jerusalem and undergo great suffering at the hands of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised. 22Peter took Him aside and began to rebuke Him, saying, ‘God forbid it, Lord! This must never happen to you’, 23but He turned and said to Peter, ‘Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling-block to me; for you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.’
24Then Jesus told His disciples, ‘If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me, 25for those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will find it. 26What will it profit them if they gain the whole world but forfeit their life? or what will they give in return for their life?
27‘The Son of Man is to come with His angels in the glory of His Father, and then He will repay everyone for what has been done. 28Truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in His kingdom.’

Text ©The New Revised Standard Version, alt, Used with permission.


Jesus lived in a region of Roman occupation, and violence was just a normal part of everyday life, especially if anyone dared to challenge the authority of the Roman governor. Torture and crucifixion were common in that environment. The disciples had grown up in that sort of world, where one powerful force would overrule another and take charge, so it’s hardly surprising that Jesus was constantly reminding them of a better way, but the better way hadn’t sunk in. When Peter declared that Jesus was the Messiah (Matthew 16:16) there was likely an expectation that Jesus would take on the Roman authorities and use His power to overthrow them. The first problem with that is that the use of violence to overthrow a power, and that is what would have been what most people at the time thought was needed to get rid of the Roman occupying forces, would only breed a new power struggle, and more violence. That’s one reason why war is so senseless, and why those who want to dominate our current world with force are only breeding more of the thing we need to rid this world of: violence. It appals me to hear that some current and some former service personnel in the Australian Defence Force are running an Instagram campaign promoting violence because that is so counter to Christ’s teaching and example. The second problem is that Jesus had been teaching the disciples a better way to live. Love conquers all. “Love your enemy” Jesus said. Have yourself labelled as a resister by not resisting.

It’s hardly surprising that Jesus would be subject to violence from within the religious establishment, considering He was often highly critical of those very people, and challenged their authority. Peter, on the other hand, couldn’t see how Jesus would be able to achieve what He proclaimed if He were subjected to such torture and a horrific death – and while we’re at it let’s not forget that those who were crucified would have been totally naked, unlike the sanitised pictures we see. Peter couldn’t image such a denigrating, humiliating death being part of the Good News. How often do we fall into the same sort of trap? How often do we argue against what God wants to do because we don’t like it, or can’t (won’t) see it? How often do we allow others to dictate what we do, and how we do it, when we should be proclaiming God’s message to all?

What did Jesus say to the one who had just proclaimed Him to be Son of Man, and the Messiah? “Get behind me Satan!” Jesus wasn’t condemning Peter for his attempt to save Christ from the cross, but condemning Satan, working through Peter’s problem in accepting the inevitable. There’s a real lesson for us there. Jesus separated Peter, one of His most ardent followers and someone able to listen to God, from the influence of Satan, who was taking Peter’s weakness and using it to attack Jesus. Can we separate the sin from the sinner in the same way? Our contemporary society can’t. I can think of many people who have been brilliant in their own way but have done something seriously wrong, and their great works have been discarded as well as them, and I can think of many others who have been treated similarly when their greatest failure is to have a different opinion from the majority. That’s what happened to Christ, except that we try to remember His good deeds, and try to explain away those bits which are difficult to accept.

Set your mind on divine things, not human things, and we stand a chance of redeeming the world. Do the reverse and you will be a stumbling block for God – though God will win in the end, so why fight?

What did Jesus mean by asking His disciples to deny themselves and pick up their cross to follow Him? It’s something which slips off the tongue easily and is gone before we think what it really means. Looking at Christ’s own example, and as followers we are challenged to follow in His footsteps, we can see that self is not the most important aspect of life. I think of the podium at major sporting events: in the middle is “I”, to the left, as we face the medal winners, is “S”omeone important to us, and on the right is “N”obody in particular. That spells sin. Instead of thinking of ourselves first, and others last we should reverse that process and think of everyone else before ourselves, except that we have a duty to care for our health, and not neglect it lest we cannot serve others.

There is great satisfaction in helping others, and not much in looking after oneself at the expense of others. We sacrifice the enjoyment and fulfilment in our lives when we ignore others, and that is what Jesus was railing against. When we encounter Christ again our work in looking after others will be rewarded, and that should be important to all of us.

We might think that the final verse in this passage indicates Jesus’s expectation that His second coming would be within the life-span of some of His disciples, but what if we consider seeing the “Son of Man coming in His kingdom” as having our eyes opened to a realisation that God’s Kingdom is here and now, and is all around us? Let us wash the paste off our eyes and see what God has given us.

Advent 3 (Year A)

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

Isaiah 35:1-10

1The wilderness and the dry land shall be glad, the desert shall rejoice and blossom; like the crocus 2it shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice with joy and singing. The glory of Lebanon shall be given to it, the majesty of Carmel and Sharon. They shall see the glory of the Lord, the majesty of our God. 3Strengthen the weak hands, and make firm the feeble knees. 4Say to those who are of a fearful heart: ‘Be strong, do not fear! Here is your God. He will come with vengeance, with terrible recompense. He will come and save you.’ 5Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf unstopped; 6then the lame shall leap like a deer, and the tongue of the dumb sing for joy. For waters shall break forth in the wilderness, and streams in the desert; 7the burning sand shall become a pool, and the thirsty ground springs of water; the haunt of jackals shall become a swamp, the grass shall become reeds and rushes. 8A highway shall be there, and it shall be called the Holy Way; the unclean shall not travel on it, but it shall be for God’s people; no traveller, not even fools, shall go astray. 9No lion shall be there, nor shall any ravenous beast come up on it; they shall not be found there, but the redeemed shall walk there. 10And the ransomed of the Lord shall return, and come to Zion with singing; everlasting joy shall be upon their heads; they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.

Text © The New Revised Standard Version (English version), alt, used with permission.


Just as hope is the recurrent theme of readings leading up to Christmas, Isaiah gives us a sense of hope for an exiled community. When we take a simple reading from scripture, and read it in isolation in our churches, we miss the connection, or disconnection in this case, with the surrounding text. This message of hope comes amid others of despair. Why? I think it’s important that even in our darkest hours we can hear the hope of a future which will restore us to a good relationship with God. Give thanks to God in all circumstances. If you break a leg, give thanks to God; if someone close to you dies, give thanks to God; if you’ve just won a major lottery, give thanks to God; if you have a child with disabilities, give thanks to God; if you lose your job, give thanks to God. Why? Because God doesn’t give us a challenge we cannot meet when we put our minds to it and trust Him to help us, and what you will receive can be a far greater reward than you might expect – just don’t expect to see the reward in a time-frame set by you. In this instant-gratification era that’s hard, I know, but it’s what God calls us to do.

Some commentators believe this passage appears too early in Isaiah for it to be in its original position. This is a passage which appears before people would expect to hear it. Absolutely fantastic! Of course it’s earlier than people would expect. That’s precisely what God has intended. Isaiah is showing us that we need to speak up against what is wrong in this world, and speak with hope for a future where we can live peacefully with others. This passage tells us that we should not wait for ’the right time’ because the right time might never come.

The message in this passage is not directed at anyone in particular, and there is no time reference which would allow us to stick it at some point in history and forget the implications of the message. No, the message applies to everyone, everywhere, in every age, including Australians in 2019! We should help the weak, those who are downhearted and fearful of the consequences of their actions because God will deal with the oppressors. We don’t have to be concerned about them. Let go and let God!

Whenever I read the next few verses I can’t help but start to sing from Handel’s Messiah. Remember the quote from last week’s reflection: ‘there are none so blind as those who will not see’? Does it matter, in terms of the message from Isaiah, if those who are literally blind do not see, when the message which Christ brought as well was that we need to be willing to open our eyes to what is happening around us, and to act. The lame can leap, the dumb can ‘sing’ and the deaf can hear when God’s message is shown in our lives. We will find what we haven’t been able to see, even though it has always been there, new life will spring forth because we are charged by the power of God – as Christians we would say by the Holy Spirit – and we will live protected from the evil ways of oppressors.

Trust God unconditionally. Do not wait for the right time to pass on messages of hope and an opportunity to redirect our ways so that we listen to God, rather than human ways of thinking, which are all-too-often self-centred, power greedy, worshipping money, and trying to stop people spreading the Good News.

Advent is a time of preparation for the coming of Christ, so let’s prepare the way for the Lord, let’s make a straight path through the wilderness around us for the Son of God, and let’s challenge ourselves with the question “What would Christ do in my circumstances?”

25th December 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

luke-2-we-are-all-innkeepersLuke 2:1-20

1In those days a decree went out from Emperor Augustus that all the world should be registered. 2This was the first registration and was taken while Quirinius was governor of Syria. 3All went to their own towns to be registered. 4Joseph also went from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to the city of David called Bethlehem, because he was descended from the house and family of David. 5He went to be registered with Mary, to whom he was engaged, and who was expecting a child. 6While they were there, the time came for her to deliver her child, 7and she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

8In that region there were shepherds living in the fields, keeping watch over their flock by night. 9Then an angel of the Lord stood before them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified, 10but the angel said to them, ‘Do not be afraid; for see — I am bringing you good news of great joy for all the people: 11to you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, who is the Messiah, the Lord. 12This will be a sign for you: you will find a child wrapped in bands of cloth and lying in a manger.’ 13Suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host, praising God and saying,
14 ‘Glory to God in the highest heaven,
and on earth peace among those whom he favours!’

15When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, ‘Let us go now to Bethlehem and see this thing that has taken place, which the Lord has made known to us.’ 16So they went with haste and found Mary and Joseph, and the child lying in the manger. 17When they saw this, they made known what had been told them about this child; 18and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds told them, 19but Mary treasured all these words and pondered them in her heart. 20The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all they had heard and seen, as it had been told them.

Text © The New Revised Standard Version (English Edition) alt, used with permission.


In most cases the passages of scripture selected for reading as part of a church service are extracts from a much larger whole. When an extract starts with “In those days”, “In that region”, or any of the multitude of beginnings which depend on previous text for their sense, I wonder why an effort is rarely made to provide us with the setting, so we know the context for the story. Some years ago I was training people to read set passages, and gave them a challenge. With just one name changed to a pronoun I read the story of Jesus on the road to Emmaus and asked them to listen as one who had never heard the story before, and to raise a hand when they could identify the main character. No-one raised a hand. If that happened with people who are already connected with a church how can we expect newcomers to church to understand what we’re talking about without the context being set?

Luke claims that the emperor Caesar (in classical Latin pronounced Kaiser, not seizer) Augustus initiated the first registration of everyone in the Roman world at a time when Quirinius was governor of Syria, and that was the reason for Joseph and Mary travelling to Bethlehem. Given that the wise men, in Matthew’s rendition of the birth story, asked Herod for guidance to get to see the new-born King of the Jews, there is a significant problem with Luke’s information. Of course, a thorough investigation of Luke’s attempt to date-stamp the birth of Jesus, written well over half a century after the event, only goes to show that scripture is theological ahead of being historical in our sense of accuracy of details such as dates. We miss the point of the birth and its significance for the world if we try to confirm or contradict details of timing in Luke’s narrative.

It’s easy for us, in the 21st century and where it’s not unusual for a woman to be pregnant before being married, to overlook the importance of Joseph’s support for Mary. Matthew 1:19 tells us that Joseph was planning on “dismissing” Mary because he was unwilling to expose her, not him, to public disgrace – as if the developing pregnancy would not be noticed – but his intention was changed after a visit from an angel. In those days a pregnancy before marriage would have brought disgrace for both parties, but if the man disappeared from the relationship early enough he might escape because she had been unfaithful – isn’t “she” always the sinful one? What’s that lump in your throat called, Adam? Joseph showed strength of both character and faith by sticking with Mary in the lead up to Jesus’ birth.

If we think that “cleanliness is next to Godliness” what might we think of the location of Christ’s birth? All the good places in Bethlehem were occupied by the time Mary and Joseph arrived, so they had to occupy a stable, with the animals around them and the smell of their feed and their urine and faeces. This was no place of cleanliness in terms we humans think of it, especially these days. It was no royal palace, fit for a king on our human scales, but an indication of Christ’s connection with the poor and with every living thing.

‘There were shepherds, abiding in the fields, watching over their flocks by night’ – sorry, I’ve sung Messiah so many times that quotes are inevitable. Our Christmas celebrations are centred on a date close to the northern hemisphere’s winter solstice, which is a time of intense cold, snow, and plenty of cloud cover. That’s certainly not a time when shepherds would be out in the fields at night, tending to their sheep: it’s a time when the sheep would be in barns or stables, protected as much as possible from the freezing conditions – and yes, it does get that cold in Israel! Even the Sahara desert got some snow recently. We don’t know the exact date of Christ’s birth; we don’t even know the actual year because when “Dionysius the Little” tried to calculate it, way back in the 6th century, he didn’t have the accurate information we have now. What we do know is that Jesus was born into a Jewish community and, later, showed his divinity as well as his humanity. As with many Christian festivals, the date was chosen to re-badge a pagan festival.

Angels come in various forms. Sometimes we don’t recognise them when they are vitally present for us, because we see just another human being. The film The Staircase tells the story of a real-life example of an angel providing a community of nuns in New Mexico with a staircase many believed was impossible, and disappearing without trace or payment as soon as it was complete. Have we been visited by angels in our lives, or, more particularly, have we been angels in the lives of others? The angels who visited the shepherds in the fields around Bethlehem were no humans who walked into the shepherds’ lives and walked out again. In this case the appearance created fear and awe, and the experience was enough to stir the shepherds into action. Can we experience the birth of Christ in such as way that we are stirred into action to spread the Good News? Can we be so stirred by our encounter with the living Lord Jesus that we spend our lives rejoicing, and glorifying and praising God for what we have heard and seen. I hope so.

11th December 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / 1 Comment on 11th December 2016

Matthew 11:2-11

a-advent-3-d
Agnus Day appears with the permission of www.agnusday.org

2When John heard, in prison, what the Messiah was doing, he sent word by his disciples 3and said to him, ‘Are you the one who is to come, or are we to wait for another?’ 4Jesus answered them, ‘Go and tell John what you hear and see: 5the blind receive their sight, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the poor have good news brought to them – 6and blessed is anyone who takes no offence at me.’

7As they went away, Jesus began to speak to the crowds about John: ‘What did you go out into the wilderness to look at? A reed shaken by the wind? 8What then did you go out to see? Someone dressed in soft robes? Look, those who wear soft robes are in royal palaces. 9What then did you go out to see? A prophet? Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet. 10This is the one about whom it is written,
      “See, I am sending my messenger ahead of you,
      who will prepare your way before you.”
11Truly I tell you, among those born of women no one has arisen greater than John the Baptist; yet the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.


To us, reading this passage just a week after the story of John baptising people in the River Jordan and declaring that Jesus is the one to follow, it seems a harsh change for John to now be questioning his own declaration; but if we look at the two passages in the context of the time, there is plenty between the two events, and the expectation of most people was that the Messiah would come and throw out the Roman occupation of their land. Given that, and the lack of movement in that direction, it’s hardly surprising that John might be querying his own declaration of some months or years earlier. Jesus’ response is almost one of “Hey, chaps, are you actually paying attention to what’s happening?” He probably knew the Hebrew Scriptures backwards, so was the reference to Isaiah’s “then shall the eyes of the blind be opened, and the ears of the deaf unstopped; then shall the lame man leap as an hart, and the tongue of the dumb shall sing” (as per Handel’s ‘Messiah’) misquoted by Matthew, or modified for some purpose? There is no reference in the Isaiah passage to lepers being cleansed or the dead being raised so their inclusion by Matthew shows a connection with the later ministry of Jesus, rather than shortly after His baptism. Verse 6 is interesting: ‘blessed is anyone who takes no offence at me.’ Is that a suggestion that those who note all the wonderful things that were happening, albeit over a period of time, and connect the dots to see who Christ really was, were blessed? Is it a challenge for those who find the actions of Jesus to be contrary to how they have perceived leadership and responsibility? I think of the number of times when the disciples tried to get Jesus to do things differently. Touching lepers was an absolute no-no; waiting until after someone had been buried to heal the grief of family was a no-no; declaring that someone had been healed because of her faith was a no-no; and welcoming children could not be tolerated. These were just some of the times when people took offence to Jesus. Blessed are those who don’t take offence.

When we’re told that “Jesus began to speak to the crowds” we should read “Jesus began to speak to our congregation”. These are relevant questions for us, today, just as they were for the crowds around Jesus in His day. What did we come to church to look at? The rhetorical question is directed at us personally, so we should ask ourselves that very question, and be honest in our response.

If we only came to see a reed blowing in the wind then there are plenty of those outside the church; if we came to see glorious frescos in the sanctuary then we are but tourists admiring someone’s skill and artistic talent; if we come to hear good music then, unless we choose the particular church carefully, we are likely to be disappointed; if we come to be uplifted by a sermon then the chances are we will leave hungry; but if we come to worship God, ignoring all the distractions, then we will be both fed and given a new lease of life.

If we come to church seeking people in clothes fit for royalty then we are going to be disappointed unless we go to a parish in a rich area, and if that’s all we seek then we will miss the Good News which the church is meant to spread. In most churches where colourful vestments are worn that is done by a small number of people in the sanctuary, representing the Kingdom of Heaven, and, hopefully, being the bearers of the Good News. Unfortunately, there are those who dress in fine robes for the show, the prestige, and the power, rather than taking on the responsibility associated with their status.

When we go to church wanting to see and hear from a prophet then we are on the right track, because good prophets will draw us closer to the Kingdom of Heaven, and will feed us spiritually, and challenge us in many other ways. We do not know when Christ will return, so new prophets need to emerge on a regular basis to carry on crying in the wilderness for us to prepare a way for the Lord. This is Advent, a time for us to prepare for the coming of the Lord. We should prepare the way by getting rid of those obstacles which would prevent Him from getting to our hearts. We might be self-centred; we might be too attached to technology to observe the world around us; we might turn a blind eye to those in need; we might engage in war to show that we are no better than our enemies and further from Christ than we think; we might worship the mighty dollar – and those are only some of the problems we might need to address. Christmas is just two weeks away. How ready am I? How ready are you?

4th December 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

Matthew 3:1-12
matthew-3a-john-the-baptist-preaching

1John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness of Judea, proclaiming, 2‘Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.’ 3This is the one of whom the prophet Isaiah spoke when he said:
 ‘The voice of one crying out in the wilderness:
 “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.” ’
4John wore clothing of camel’s hair with a leather belt around his waist, and his food was locusts and wild honey. 5Then the people of Jerusalem and all Judea were going out to him, and all the regions along the Jordan, 6and they were baptised by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins.

7When he saw many Pharisees and Sadducees coming for baptism, he said to them: ‘You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? 8Bear fruit worthy of repentance. 9Do not presume to say to yourselves: “We have Abraham as our ancestor”; for I tell you, God is able, from these stones, to raise up children to Abraham. 10Even now the axe is lying at the root of the trees; every tree therefore that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.’

11‘I baptise you with water for repentance, but one who is more powerful than I is coming after me; I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptise you with the Holy Spirit and fire. 12His winnowing-fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing-floor and will gather his wheat into the granary; but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.’

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.


Oh how we’ve lost significant meaning of some words, because their over-use has resulted in the important meaning becoming subservient. One such word is “repent”. Too often, these days, “repent” is used as a synonym for “sorry”. The invitation to the confession in the Book of Common Prayer (1928) Eucharist opens with the words “Ye that do truly and earnestly repent you of your sins, and are in love and charity with your neighbours, and intend to lead a new life, following the commandments of God and walking from henceforth in His holy ways …” The BCP embraces that aspect of repentance which involves turning around from what we have been doing, and being genuine in our desire to live according to what God wants us to do. It’s too easy, with the common use of “repent” to think all we need to do is say “sorry” to God. Repentance includes an acknowledgement that our ways have not been according to God’s will, and that change is needed.

When John reportedly said “the kingdom of heaven has come near” he was, of course, working on the belief that Jesus was already around and would establish the kingdom of heaven, on earth. We know, from Christ’s own words, that even the Son didn’t know when he would return, so we can’t know either. That makes it all the more important that we are prepared for His second coming now, and don’t put off our preparations. “If the owner of the house knew at what hour the thief would come he would have stayed awake” [Matthew 24:43]. There is thus some urgency, even for us, to be prepared. If your Christmas plans include having friends or family to a celebration meal, do you leave dirty washing on the floors? Do you ignore the dust and the dirt on the floor? Do you go to the shops and only buy enough food for yourself? Of course not! If the kingdom of heaven is near, and we are preparing for the second coming of Christ, shouldn’t we do all the cleaning we would do to welcome our King? Shouldn’t we be serious about preparing the way for the Lord? Because of the lack of punctuation in the original writings, the quote from Isaiah could read “the voice of one crying ‘in the wilderness prepare the way for the Lord’”, in which case the lack of active Christian presence in our communities might be the wilderness in which the way needs to be prepared, or it could read “the voice of one crying in the wilderness ‘prepare the way for the Lord’”, in which case we have to listen to the lone voice, not the combined and harmonised voice, or leadership. Either way, we should be preparing the way for the Lord to enter into our lives in a decisive way. Let’s put out the welcome mat, and mean it.

Some may wonder why Matthew chose to mention what John wore and ate. I believe that it is to emphasise that this call to repentance comes not from the religious establishment, but from someone who could easily be discarded by that very establishment. John was different; John did not dress like everyone else; John did not eat what others would eat; but God chose John to proclaim the Good News. How often do our church leaders reject those who offer themselves to walk in Christ’s footsteps simply because they are different, and don’t fit the mold which those leaders use, probably subconsciously, in their ‘discernment’?

If you want to take literally the idea the people from all over Judea came to be baptised by John then you must acknowledge that he would have been a very busy beaver. The idea in the reference is, of course, that the people were clamouring for good guidance to renew their relationship with God in a meaningful way, and they weren’t being satisfied elsewhere.

We might think of John’s description of ‘Pharisees and Sadducees” as a brood of vipers in terms of Matthew trying to separate the Christian community from the Jewish one following the destruction of the temple in AD70, and that might be true, but there is also the element of criticism of the pedantic and legalistic approach of the Pharisees to the way they approach worship, in contrast with the loving, caring approach of Christ. Those who wish to behave like Pharisees should be reminded that Christ’s approach in nothing like theirs. Personally I’d prefer to follow Christ than follow any Pharisee. It is not good enough to just claim a direct link back to Abraham (or to the Apostles) if we have lost our way and become tied up with controlling everything everyone does. God is the master gardener, and, just as Christ did to the fig tree, He is prepared to chop down the biggest trees if they are not producing fruit. Let the one who has ears, hear. [Matthew 11:15]

When I think of this passage through EfM (Education for Ministry) eyes, I see a world in which the people are screaming for spiritual guidance because the religious hierarchy appears to have left them to themselves; I see an honest call to genuine repentance and dire consequences if we don’t; I see judgement in the form of the description of those who seek to escape the inevitable by being superficial; and I see hope of reconciliation through baptism, initially with water and later with the Holy Spirit.

Verse 11 includes an example of what I call the future present tense in English. Essentially we use the present tense to indicate something in the almost immediate future. When a friend is scheduled to have a meal with us next week, we say “my friend is coming” even though the friend may not leave for several more days. That gives us a sense of urgency, and gets us to prepare. John said “one who is more powerful than I is coming” even though Christ was not there. Maybe we should proclaim, in the Eucharist, “Christ is coming again” to stir us into action preparing the way for the Lord.