Musings on Scripture

– and what isn’t always said

11th September 2016

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment

Jeremiah 4:11-18

11It will be said to this people and to Jerusalem: A hot wind comes from me out of the bare heights in the desert toward my poor people, not to winnow or cleanse — 12a wind too strong for that. Now it is I who speak in judgment against them. 13Look! He comes up like clouds, his chariots like the whirlwind; his horses are swifter than eagles — woe to us, for we are ruined! 14O Jerusalem, wash your heart clean of wickedness so that you may be saved. How long shall your evil schemes lodge within you? 15For a voice declares from Dan and proclaims disaster from Mount Ephraim. 16Tell the nations, “Here they are!” Proclaim against Jerusalem, “Besiegers come from a distant land; they shout against the cities of Judah. 17They have closed in around her like watchers of a field, because she has rebelled against me, says the Lord. 18Your ways and your doings have brought this upon you. This is your doom; how bitter it is! It has reached your very heart.”

Text © New Revised Standard Version, used with permission.

The set text omits verses 13-18 and adds verses 21-28.

Psalm 14

1Fools say in their hearts, “There is no God.” They are corrupt, they do abominable deeds; there is no one who does good.
2The Lord looks down from heaven on mankind to see if there are any who are wise, who seek after God.
3They have all gone astray, they are all alike perverse; there is no one who does good, no, not one.
4Have they no knowledge, all the evildoers who eat up my people as they eat bread, and do not call upon the Lord?
5There they shall be in great terror, for God is with the company of the righteous.
6You would confound the plans of the poor, but the Lord is their refuge.
7O that deliverance for Israel would come from Zion! When the Lord restores the fortunes of his people, Jacob will rejoice; Israel will be glad.

Text © New Revised Standard Version, used with permission.


The principal aim of these reflections is to look at one passage of scripture from the selection set down for the Sunday before I post my comments. However, the selection of readings is supposed to have a common thread, and sometimes that thread requires a look at more than one passage. Today is an example.

The author of Psalm 14 is clearly expressing negative comments about the “fools” who do not believe in God and follow the teachings of scripture: the Lord looks down to see if anyone is wise and seeking after God, but “they” have all gone astray. Who are “they”? It’s incredibly easy for us to separate the wheat from the chaff and include ourselves on the “good” side of that separation, then label everyone who isn’t with us as against us. Sometimes that separation takes on a self-righteous tone which demeans us. Some years ago an Anglican bishop I knew was invited to the ordination service for a Roman Catholic deacon. Though the service included Holy Communion the Anglican bishop was not allowed to take the bread (or wine) because he wasn’t “Christian”, that is, he wasn’t baptised and confirmed in the Roman Catholic Church. At my son’s baptism we had Roman Catholic, Anglican and Uniting Church clergy participating, and the sermon made a point that we were not making a new Anglican but a new Christian. Far too often I hear comments along the lines of “you don’t do things the way we do, so you’re not Christian” even if the last bit is by implication, rather than direct statement. Psalm 14 rails against those who did things differently from the established trend, but the author wasn’t a prophet, rather a hymn writer. When we look at what a prophet was saying about the situation we are faced with a quite different scenario. Within verses omitted from the set text for the week – why they were excluded begs other questions – Jeremiah shouts “O Jerusalem, wash your heart clean of wickedness so that you may be saved” [v14], “Besiegers come from a distant land” [v16], and “Your ways and your doings have brought this upon you” [v18]. Once again the prophet is crying that the leaders are just as corrupt as any of those against whom they rail. Isaiah put it another way: “All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way.” [Is 53:6]

It’s very easy for us to think that these passages refer to times in the history of the Jewish communities, but, as with all scripture, there is a message for us in the 21st century just as much as there was when Jeremiah was writing, mostly in the 7th century BC. What this combination of passages calls on us to do is to look at ourselves and see if we are guilty of classing ourselves as “good” and others as “bad” when the labels could easily be reversed. Have we lost track of what we are called, by God, to do in this world? Have we put ourselves above others as better Christians? Have we failed to recognise the Christ in others and looked for ways to denigrate those who are different from us, or approach our task of worship differently? How many false prophets have we allowed into “the Church”?

I have no doubt that sexual misconduct by those who have been able to get into influential positions in the church, either as clergy or lay leaders, is contrary to the message of love which comes from God, at least as perceived by the vast majority of Australians, but I truly wonder if we have been like the hireling who deserted the flock of sheep when a wolf attacked [John 10:12]. Only a tiny proportion of those entrusted with God’s work in the various denominations has failed to honour that task, yet we have allowed a very negative response from the non-church-going public to cloud the very good work done by the majority, and we have allowed those many good Christian leaders to be tarred with the same brush as those who have brought disgust.

 

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