Musings on Scripture

– and what isn’t always said

23rd October 2016 Joel

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment
Pieter Bruegel "Harvest"
Pieter Bruegel, “Harvest” from Art in the Christian Tradition, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library, Nashville, Tennessee, USA

Joel 2:23-32

23O children of Zion, be glad and rejoice in the Lord your God; for he has given the early rain for your vindication, he has poured down for you abundant rain, the early and the later rain, as before. 24The threshing floors shall be full of grain, the vats shall overflow with wine and oil. 25I will repay you for the years that the swarming locust has eaten, the hopper, the destroyer, and the cutter, my great army, which I sent against you. 26You shall eat in plenty and be satisfied, and praise the name of the Lord your God, who has dealt wondrously with you. My people shall never again be put to shame. 27You shall know that I am in the midst of Israel, and that I, the Lord, am your God and there is no other, and my people shall never again be put to shame.

28Then afterward I will pour out my spirit on all flesh; your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, and your young men shall see visions. 29Even on the male and female slaves, in those days, I will pour out my spirit. 30I will show portents in the heavens and on the earth, blood and fire and columns of smoke. 31The sun shall be turned to darkness, and the moon to blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord comes. 32Then everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved; for in Mount Zion and in Jerusalem there shall be those who escape, as the Lord has said, and among the survivors shall be those whom the Lord calls.

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.


I was intending completing the reflection on Joel when I was asked to focus on the gospel passage from Luke, so here’s a bonus.

Joel? Who’s Joel? How many of us can pick up a Bible and quickly find Joel without referring to the index?

The book of Joel is divided differently in the Hebrew from how it is done in English, so who decided that we English speakers are better at organising scripture than the original owners of that scripture? This segment opens with abundance in the wake of desolation. You might think “bad year, good year”, but that’s not the case. One verse about the locusts eating all the crops – and everything else – does not do justice, if that’s a fair word to use in the circumstances, to the years of famine brought about, according to scripture, because of the Hebrew people not paying attention to God. I can imagine God thinking “why do you humans go off on your own ways so often and so far that I have to send you plagues, famines, sheer desolation, and more to get you even to the starting point of looking to me for your blessings?” I don’t want to count the number of times that God’s chosen people went off the rails and had to be brought back by some horrors being inflicted on them. It would be depressing! How many times should I forgive my brother: seventy times seven? If that were God’s limit then we’d be in strife very soon.

God, of course, is willing to forgive us for our blatant transgressions, far more than we are willing to forgive others for their transgressions against us. As a consequence, God is now willing to provide food in abundance, joy for all, and a wonderfully new experience in that close relationship we have with our maker. Never again will the Hebrew people be put to shame; until, or course, they forget that God is in the midst of Israel, or that He is the one and only God. That’s a different story, which we know in the 21st century AD but they didn’t in the early 5th century BC.

The declaration that God will pour out His spirit on all flesh is familiar to those of us who have read or heard the Pentecost passage from Acts [Acts 2:14-21] where this excerpt from Joel is quoted as near to verbatim as we can get with one passage in Hebrew and the other in Greek. In Joel, there is no indication of when this will occur other than “afterwards”; in Acts, Peter adds “in the last days”. What we see in the declaration is that God will pour His spirit on all humans – the text says all flesh, but the list is only of various groups of people – with no boundaries. That is, there will be no discrimination on the grounds of gender, age or social status. The spirit will be poured on sons, daughters, old men, young men, slaves, let me add wives and mothers, and all shall, not will, prophesy. It’s amazing that this list was written more than 400 years before Paul’s famous “there is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female” if we take the King James rendition, though the Greek actually says “neither is there male and female”. [Galations 3:28]. It was clearly understood, even in the time of Joel, that God’s will was for equality, not segregation or subversion. If that concept was understood 2500 years ago, why do we still have opposition to women taking leadership roles in the churches?

In days when there was no understanding of the physical process of eclipses, the idea of the sun being turned to darkness, and the moon being turned to blood would have elicited fear of the end time whenever there was one – and we now know that they occur several times every year. Have we become complacent because we have a scientific understanding of eclipses? Quite likely.

If we are approaching the end time, and nobody really knows, have we done enough to reach out to those people who have little or no contact with God, remembering that “all who call upon the name of the Lord will be saved”? Some would answer that it is up to God to extend His grace to those who have had no contact with, or knowledge of the existence of God, and that we cannot reach out to everyone in every country because we don’t have the resources. That might be true, but does it exonerate us if we leave those who live close to us, and those with whom we work, ignorant of the loving grace of God?

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