Musings on Scripture

– and what isn’t always said

27th November 2016 (Advent)

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment
psalm-122-f
Image © City Church York, Pennsilvania

Psalm 122

1I was glad when they said to me,
    ‘Let us go to the house of the Lord!’
2Our feet are standing
    within your gates, O Jerusalem.
3Jerusalem—built as a city
    that is bound firmly together.
4To it the tribes go up,
    the tribes of the Lord,
      as was decreed for Israel,
    to give thanks to the name of the Lord.
5For there the thrones for judgement were set up,
    the thrones of the house of David.
6Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:
    ‘May they prosper who love you.
7Peace be within your walls,
    and security within your towers.’
8For the sake of my relatives and friends
    I will say, ‘Peace be within you.’
9For the sake of the house of the Lord our God,
    I will seek your good.

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.


I grew up with the understanding that the selection of scriptures set for any Sunday eucharist was made so that a common thread could be seen through them. That included the Hebrew Scripture passage, the psalm, a reading from the New Testament, and the gospel reading. On one Sunday, whilst in Bunbury, I preached a four course banquet, bringing to life all of the readings in relation to each other. In trying to limit my reflection to just one of the readings set for Advent Sunday 2016 I was faced with a dilemma, because they are all good readings for reflection, and they are tied together.

When I noted the psalm was 122 I was transported back to a time when Michael Wentzell was organist at St George’s Cathedral, in Perth, and to music written by René Rebound. This is a joyful song, celebrating an invitation to go to the house of the Lord. The music which Michael and Albert McPherson chose for their rendition of Psalm 122 is lively and joyful, unlike the usual rendering of the same psalm when read straight from the prayer book, whether done together or with a leader reading parts and the congregation reading the rest.

Together in Song, hymn 78, which Rebound, Wentzell and McPherson composed, opens with the refrain “I was overjoyed, Alleluia, when they said come with us to the house of the Lord.” Am I “overjoyed” when asked to go with someone to their “house of the Lord”? My answer to that is, unfortunately, “nothing like as often as I would like to be.” On my travels I have visited many parishes where the experience has not conveyed an impression of people who were overjoyed to be attending. To be fair, that’s not to say that the people haven’t been enthused by the Holy Spirit, or coming because they know that they can be spiritually fed. When I think of days when the church encourages people to bring others with them, I ask “if unchurched people come will they be turned away not by words or actions at the door, but by what they experience during the service. When joyful psalms sound anything but joyful, are we going to encourage people to come again? To me, that’s a “no brainer”.

For the Israelites of the time, Psalm 122 was a song to be sung on the way to the temple in Jerusalem – a time when they visited the most important religious shrine in their experience. To us, the most important religious shrine is usually our parish church, sometimes the cathedral. One of the beauties which these people encountered was that of their sacred music: they were uplifted by the sounds of well sung music and their joy was real. I remember the time when most parish churches had four-part choirs and someone with good musical skill to train them and to play for services. Alas, we have lost that in most places, so the uplifting of souls during our services is dependent on the hymns or songs chosen, how well they are presented, and how involved the congregation is in uplifting each other.

Verse 4 of the biblical version, or verse 2 of hymn 78, reminds us of our need to worship and to praise the name of the Lord for all time. We gather together to make a joyful noise to the Lord so that we are giving thanks to God for everything we have, good or bad. As someone said: “if you win the lottery, praise the Lord; if you’ve just got married, praise the Lord; if you break a leg, praise the Lord!”

Psalm 122 is also a song of hope, and expectation. Let us pray not only for peace in the physical city of Jerusalem, but also for peace in every place which represents Jerusalem for those who cannot be there. While we’re at it, let’s pray for God’s peace. Those of us who live in Australia might be thinking that we already live in a peaceful environment, but those who have been physically or mentally abused, robbed or defamed would hardly describe their own experience as one of peace; and those affected by the terrorist activities which we hear about more and more frequently would also dispute a sense of peace. God’s peace is far more than an absence of war on our own soil, because it includes a fair sharing of our resources and a willingness to look after each other.

In keeping with this thrust for God’s peace to reign in Jerusalem, we can think of today’s passage from Isaiah, in which the prophet suggests that, in response to the word of the Lord, people will turn their swords into ploughshares and their spears into pruning forks, and they will no longer learn to be at war. This is the way to God’s peace, not spending more and more on military might and threatening nuclear war because we can’t get our own way. Let us be responsible, rather than irresponsible like those who engage in violent behaviour of any kind; let us, from congregations all the way up the ecclesiastical ladder, speak up for God’s peace; and let us be overjoyed when we are called to the House of the Lord.

This psalm ends with a challenge. Note the last words: YOUR good. For the sake of the house of the Lord our God, which, to Christians, is all the people not just a building, we should seek God’s good. I acknowledge that that will be tough; but it is achievable.

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