Musings on Scripture

– and what isn’t always said

6th November 2016 (All Saints’ Day)

Published / by Steven Secker / Leave a Comment
let-them-praise-dancing
from indulgy.com

Psalm 149

1Praise the Lord! Sing to the Lord a new song, His praise in the assembly of the faithful.
2Let Israel be glad in its Maker; let the children of Zion rejoice in their King.
3Let them praise His name with dancing, making melody to Him with tambourine and lyre.
4For the Lord takes pleasure in His people; He adorns the humble with victory.
5Let the faithful exult in glory; let them sing for joy on their couches.
6Let the high praises of God be in their throats, and two-edged swords in their hands,
7to execute vengeance on the nations and punishment on the peoples,
8to bind their kings with fetters and their nobles with chains of iron,
9to execute on them the judgment decreed. This is glory for all his faithful ones. Praise the Lord!

Text © New Revised Standard Version alt, used with permission.

 


Joy, joy, joy! With joy my heart is singing, for the one who sings, prays twice, according to St Augustine and many who have followed him. I am reminded of a visit one of my theological college lecturers made to a distant country, which shall not be named. On noting an absence of musical instruments in churches he visited the lecturer asked the reason, and was told that it was OK for the Romans, the Anglicans, the Uniting Church, and Protestant churches to have musical instruments, “but not in the House of God”!

The Psalms formed the hymn book for the Hebrew people. Music was as much a part of their life as it is for most of us today; and it is appropriate that we use our musical talents to worship God. Whilst the first verse of Psalm 149 encourages us to “sing a new song” I think the intention was that such new songs should be meaningful, directed towards worshipping God, and not banal, over-repetitive, or monotonous. From that you might gather that I have encountered all three, and sometimes in the one song. With the demise of nearly all parish church choirs in the Anglican tradition we have lost the opportunity to hear beautiful music played and sung. A four-part harmonisation of some of the still popular hymns is far more uplifting, even for those with little musical involvement, than singing the same hymns in unison. There is a desperate need to a return to singing in parts. The motto of the Royal School of Church Music is “Psallam spiritu et mente”, which means “singing with spirit and understanding.” New songs, created in that vein, can be hugely uplifting, and be of benefit to everyone.

The people are encouraged to be glad for what their maker has given them, and to rejoice in having someone, as monarch, who cares for everyone, and loves them unconditionally. We are encouraged to include dance in our worship, though there are many who believe church services to be an inappropriate place for that. Indeed, the original dances mentioned in this psalm were not celebrations for the Lord in thankfulness for the wonders of the world, but had overtones of military might, somewhat akin to the Haka performed by the New Zealand All Black rugby team. Nevertheless, dancing was encouraged, and should still be. Different means of producing music are encouraged: the version in A Prayer Book for Australia renders this as “with timbrel and with harp” but the important point is that all musical instruments should be welcomed. You could hardly expect the writers of the psalms to include bassoons, flutes, violins, harpsichords or organs, all of which were invented many centuries later.

Verses 4 and 5 continue this theme of celebration and worship with pleasure and adoration being expressed on the part of the Lord as we concentrate on the good things of life; but the tone changes drastically with the second half of verse 6. Why, oh why do we humans have to think that they must engage in violence to overcome those who think differently from ourselves? Why do we so easily forget that “vengeance is mine” as written in Deuteronomy 32:35? Why do we assume that we have the right to extract vengeance on behalf of God? Why do we not learn from such admonitions? Over the centuries verses such as 6b to 9a have been used out of context to defend actions which should offend the vast majority of sane people. We only need to look at areas of the world today where there is conflict to see this playing out time and time again. Psalm 149 is not just Christian scripture, it is scripture for Jews and Muslims alike. We are all “people of the book”. [I was surprised to find that, in Arabic, a Muslim is someone who adheres to Islam, but a Moslem is someone who is evil and unjust].

Some years ago it was said – if someone can give me the reference I’d really appreciate it – that if the governments of the world spent half of their defence budgets on cultural exchange programmes there would be no wars. Most of Australia’s cultural exchange activities are run by small organisations which are not allowed to compensate hosting families for the additional costs of having an extra person with them for up to a year, and though those costs include food, water, electricity and transport, Centrelink is unable to consider the extra person a dependent because school fees are paid by the biological parents; and those who come a volunteers are expected to contribute out of the money they are not allowed to receive. We need to rethink our priorities when dealing with people overseas. We may think we have the best living conditions in our part of the world, and we may believe that God has given us those good living conditions because we have been faithful – though that’s hard to justify with many churches becoming less and less relevant to the people around them – but does it give us the right to extract vengeance because other people don’t agree with us? I think not.

Fortunately, Psalm 149 returns to its original focus on God. Let us truly “Praise the Lord!”

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